5 Best Types of Intellectual Property Form

With an intellectual property form, inventions, such a as literary, designs, and other artistic works is protected in law by patents, copyright and trademarks. Intellectual property enables people to earn recognition or financial benefit from what they invent or create. Essentially,intellectual property system aims to foster an environment in which creativity and innovation can flourish.

Forms of Intellectual Property

Intellectual property includes tangible forms of creations of the mind. Inventions such as literary works, paintings, designs, and even bred plants are some examples of intellectual property. Keep in mind that ideas alone are not intellectual property. Like all forms of property, the ownership of intellectual property are dictated by national laws.

Agreement Intellectual Property Form

Agreement Intellectual Property Form

Agreement Intellectual Property Form

Consent Intellectual Property Form

Consent Intellectual Property Form

Consent Intellectual Property Form

Intellectual Property Declaration Form

Intellectual Property Declaration Form

Intellectual Property Declaration Form

Transfer Intellectual Property Form

Intellectual Property Transfer Form

Intellectual Property Transfer Form

Intellectual Property Waiver Form

Intellectual Property Waiver Form

Intellectual Property Waiver Form

Release Intellectual Property Form

Release Intellectual Property Form

Release Intellectual Property Form

Characteristics of Intellectual Property

  • Itallowa chance for business monopoly.
  • The rights are granted by local government.
  • It may be co-owned, and each co-owners have equal rights.
  • Like all physical property, they may be sold, given away, or licensed.
  • If another party uses inappropriately someone’s intellectual property, the owner ought to protect their rights.
  • Inappropriate use may be stopped by court order.
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Descriptions of Intellectual Property Form

1. Patents

A patent is a right granted by national laws to the inventor in purpose to prevent anyone else from making, using or selling the invention. Inventions can take the form of specific devices, chemical compositions, processes or specific uses of things.

In order to be patentable, an invention must fill these criteria: it must be novel, non-obvious and useful.The criteria of novelty is responsible for the of secrecy that exists around patents. The invention must be unknown to public before the patent is granted. This means if any invention is found on the Internet, in video, photos, or publications, the patent may not be granted.

The invention must be non-obvious to anyone skilled in the art. If the invention is in the field of polymer chemistry, andthe polymer chemist hears of the invention say, “Really? How do you do that?” then you know the invention is non-obvious.

Utility is the easiest criteria to fill because it relates to the ability of the invention to do something. No judgment is made of an invention about its potential by the patent office.

2. Copyright

Copyright is the right given by a government to the author of written material. It applies to written text found on website, paper book, eBook, handwritten on the back of an envelope, music (lyrics and song), and software. Copyright also applies to visual media, like photo, artwork, videos, movies, and performances.

Copyright only applies to the exact form of the work, so two similar stories do not necessarily infringe upon each other. The content of the work is not owned by the copyright holder. A musician may record a song and own the copyright of the record but not the lyrics if someone else wrote it.

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Like a patent, copyright gives the author the right to prevent others from reproducing and selling their copyrighted work. Unlike patents, no registration or application needs to be made for copyright to be granted.

Copyright also lasts in varying times after creation, but generally it lasts for 50 to 75 years after the death of the author.

3. Trademarks

Trademarks may be a combination of words, names, or just one of these things. They tend to render instant recognition of a brand, company or product. We seem to only need a fleeting glimpse of a symbol to recognize a brand. For instance, the Nike checkmark or Apple’s forbidden fruit.

Even if a company has not registered their name, but has been using it for years, it may be enough to prevent anyone else from using it. However, to ensure protection, it is best to register it.

Like patents and copyright, trademarks give the holder the right to prevent others from using the mark. Trademarks are usually granted for 15 years, but may be reapplied after the term is up.

4. Trade secrets

A trade secret is something a business keeps secret because itholds a competitive advantage. They may be the composition of matter such asa recipe, or an efficient process for manufacturing, or it may be a code that is kept secret.

In order to maintain rights to a trade secret, a company must be able to show it has taken measures to protect its secret. For instance, keeping information locked in filing cabinets and behind restricted access doors. Damages for leak of trade secrets can be sought through the courts.

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5. Industrial Designs

The last intellectual property form is industrial designs. You can obtain proprietary right to a version of a common, or not so common, object. This is the registered industrial design for the iPod. It is easy to understand that this product has a unique look. Other aspects of the iPod, such as the way it works and the software that underlies its operation can be protected by patents.